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Aging in Twentieth-Century Britain$
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Charlotte Greenhalgh

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780520298781

Published to California Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1525/california/9780520298781.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.california.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of California Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CALSO for personal use.date: 01 April 2020

“Making the Best of My Appearance”

“Making the Best of My Appearance”

Grooming in Old Age

Chapter:
(p.103) Chapter Four “Making the Best of My Appearance”
Source:
Aging in Twentieth-Century Britain
Author(s):

Charlotte Greenhalgh

Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:10.1525/california/9780520298781.003.0005

Older women and men were celebrated in fashion and beauty culture during the middle decades of the twentieth century. In British Vogue, for example, the character Mrs. Exeter modeled glamourous clothing and advised older women about style from 1949 until the mid-1960s. Dashing older men graced the magazine’s pages beside her. Many older people who wrote for social research organization Mass Observation paid careful attention to their appearances. This group of Britons had sufficient resources to spend time and money on shopping and grooming. Many among them felt joy when they selected the ‘right’ outfits and were proud of their attractive complexions, hands, or hair. This chapter explores personal responses to physical aging, including the pleasure of looking good.

Keywords:   old age, aging, ageing, Mass Observation, grooming, beauty, fashion, cosmetics, Vogue, Mrs. Exeter

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